Home       Why Prepare?        Contact Us       Prepper Films       Prepper Books       Advertise       Support/Donate       Survival Seeds

20 October, 2012

REVIEW: The Walking Dead: Season 2 - Episode 10 "18 Miles Out"

My previous reviews for this series can be accessed by clicking the links below:

Season 1:

Episode 1
Episode 2
Episode 3
Episode 4
Episode 5
Episode 6

Season 2:

Episode 1
Episode 2
Episode 3
Episode 4
Episode 5
Episode 6
Episode 7
Episode 8
Episode 9 

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.


Episode 10 begins with a glimpse of the near future: Shane and Rick are being chased by Walkers as Randall (the wounded combatant from the hostile group who they took back to the farm to treat), his hands restrained behind his back, does his best not to be seen.  Eventually, Shane is cornered inside a school bus with no apparent avenue of escape.

We then flash back to the present, which, as we learn through dialogue, is about a week after where we left things in episode 9.  Rick and Shane drive out to a crossroads.  Shane comments that he thought they were going further to which Rick replies that they're going out 18 miles from the farm, but first he wants to talk.  He confronts Shane about killing Otis and his overall approach to things and the fact that Lori thinks he's a danger to them.  Shane broaches that he is not sure Rick would have done what he did that night which, ultimately, saved Carl's life to which Rick heatedly points out that he will do whatever he has to protect his family, and the only reason he didn't break Shane's jaw over him and Lori after he figured it out wasn't weakness; it was because he understood.  For his part, Shane tells him that taking care of Lori and Carl kept him alive as much as he kept them alive and he swears to Rick that he had never lusted after his wife before the collapse and that, if he could take it back, he would.

Back at the farm, Lori gives Maggie advice about Glenn.  Beth seems to have recovered physically, but still doesn't have her head in the right place.  She criticizes Lori for bringing a child into the world and won't eat.  Lori later tries to help her see that there can still be positive things, and she seems a bit better, but it turns-out to be a ruse: she keeps a knife from her otherwise untouched food tray so that she can commit suicide.  Luckily, Lori realizes and makes her give it up.  Lori then sends Andrea to find Maggie or Hershel, because she's afraid to leave Beth alone.

Meanwhile, Rick is thinking ahead as they drive.  He states that they need to start using their knives more when there's only a single Walker as it is both quieter and saves ammunition.  He mentions that they need to start thinking about stockpiling dry goods and warm clothes for the coming Winter.  He hopes they will have another harsh Winter like the year before the collapse and wonders if they could be lucky enough that the Walkers will freeze or at least be slowed down considerably by harsh weather.

They end up going further than the 18 miles they'd agreed upon in an effort to give Randall a better shot at survival, rather than leaving him on the side of the road somewhere.  It turns out that Randall is trussed-up in the back of the SUV; this is the end-game of the plan we heard discussed in a previous episode to turn the boy loose somewhere away from the farm and allow him to try to survive on his own.  They eventually find some sort of facility with a fenced-in area that might have been a school or something similar.  Honestly, it is never exactly identified, but it seems fairly secure.  Oddly, they find several dead Walkers, but they cannot locate where they were bitten.

They are in the process of leaving their prisoner there with a knife when a problem arises: it seems Randall knows Maggie.  He went to school with her.  They weren't friends, but he knows her and her father -- who they were and where they lived i.e. where the farm is located.  They are now faced with the possibility that, despite all of their OPSEC countermeasures, he could still lead his group to the farm if he ever managed to find his way back to them.  Shane tries to kill him, but Rick wants to take him back and lock him in the barn to take the night to decide.  All of Shane's doubts resurface at this which he sees as another example of Rick's indecisiveness and he tells him that he doesn't believe he (Rick) has it in him to do what he must to keep them safe.  The two finally come to blows and the ruckus attracts Walkers.  This is the scene we began the episode with. 

Back at the farm, Maggie confronts Beth, while, downstairs in the kitchen, Andrea argues that Lori should never have stopped the girl from carrying out her suicide plan.  She states that if Beth is going to live, she has to figure out on her own that she wants to keep living, and that, if she's serious about suicide, she'll find a way.  Lori and Andrea end-up getting into about other things that stray into issues concerning the role of the women in the group, etc.  

Beth wants Maggie and herself to commit suicide together, so neither has to lose the other or be gutted by Walkers when the farm is inevitably overrun.  She has lost all hope, not believing that their Dad and her boyfriend can protect them, and she would rather die peacefully than in violence.  Andrea comes to relieve Maggie in watching over Beth, and, when they are alone, she offers to let the girl kill herself if she wants.  Before leaving her alone to make her choice, she tells her that the pain doesn't go away; you just make room for it.  Beth does try to slit her wrists with glass from the broken bathroom mirror, but can't go through with it completely.  Andrea argues that, since the cuts weren't deep, it means that Beth has decided she wants to live. Maggie is furious, nonetheless, and banishes Andrea from the house.

Randall tries to talk Rick into leaving Shane (who, you'll recall, is trapped in the school bus), and it  seems as though he is about to abandon him, but changes his mind in favor of another plan.  He has Randall drive their car as he shoots out the passenger side window, giving Shane a chance to escape through the rear door of the bus.  Once they're safely away, they tie Randall back up and put him back in the SUV's storage area.  The two men then have a final conversation before going back to the farm, in which Rick tells Shane that he knows he's probably going to have to kill Randall, but that he's going to take at least a night to think it through, because it shouldn't be easy to kill a person.  He then returns Shane's gun to him (he took it when Shane tried to shoot Randall), and he makes it clear that if Shane is going to stay with their group, then he's got to trust Rick and follow his lead.  In essence, he is offering Shane something of a chance at redemption.

It seems to me that, at this point, Rick isn't necessarily sure he has his friend back, but rather that they're back on equal footing.  They've each had their say and thrown some punches and gotten everything out in the open.  Looking at the expression on Shane's face as they ride back, however, it's harder to know what he's thinking.  Only time will tell.

Again, we dealt with mostly philosophical questions in this episode.  Some of the issues broached touched on traditional gender roles in a world gone crazy; an individual's right to make decisions about their own life, including whether they should be allowed to choose if they want to continue living or not; and weighing threats to security against a person's life.  Another thing that is important is that, while driving, Shane sees a Walker trudging through a field, giving one the impression that, though they haven't seen many of them around Hershel's rural farm (in stark contrast to when they were in Atlanta, a major population center), the world is still thick with them.  Could Walkers from the cities be pouring-out into the countryside, little by little, in some perverse amalgamation of the Golden Horde theory held among survivalist folks?

Also, I found it refreshing to hear Rick talking about their need to start stockpiling dry goods for the lean Winter months.  Preparation, preparation, preparation!

No comments:

Post a Comment

All comments on this blog are moderated, meaning they don't appear until approved by me. So, when your comment doesn't appear immediately, *DO NOT* throw a hissy-fit and assume I'm refusing negative comments (yes, it really happened). I approve pretty much everything that isn't obvious SPAM, negative or not, and I promise you that will include your hissy-fit comments, accusing me of a grand conspiracy to squash dissenting ideas (also really happened). The result, of course, being that you will look like a fool, and the rest of us will laugh heartily at your stupidity.