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31 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 2, Episodes 4 & 5 (Combined)

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
This episode of the series makes a point of showing us that, regardless of any laws passed by a burgeoning government to make things illegal, the trade in so-called "contraband" will survive as long as any commerce survives. History has shown us this time and time again, whether it be the trade in illegal narcotics or something as benign as alcohol that the government unwisely attempted to ban during the Prohibition era, basically giving birth to the violent phenomenon of gangsters like Al Capone using American streets as their battleground. The only difference is that – once things have begun to be outlawed or only allowed to be purchased from government-approved sources – this trade will continue under cover of darkness and involve avoiding government checkpoints, etc.

And never doubt that, in a scenario like the one portrayed in the show, such domination of trade could conceivably occur and would be yet another means of governmental control of the populace. Remember that the Boston Tea Party was about the unfair taxation of a popular beverage without the people feeling fairly represented in deciding such things. And, in a storyline like the series, it isn't difficult to draw an analogy between Jennings & Rall and the Haliburton Corporation (which I've already mentioned in another article) and – historically – in the East India Trading Company. 

This episode also brings home to the viewers the tyrannical methods that might be utilized in such an environment of control, such as imprisonment without trial and holding things over the heads of locals in an effort to get them to inform on their neighbors. In fact, it could be argued – if one is comfortable going in quite so far – that our own Federal government is already stepping dangerously close to such behavior, instituting programs that are designed for people to basically report their neighbors for anything they think might be suspicious, whether there's any proof or reason to believe such or not. In the series, however, the burgeoning new government of the Allied States of America and their corporate allies are going much further, instigating a clash between them and the local authorities in Jericho. What we are talking about, of course, is the formation of a Resistance movement, which is a realistic and proud tradition pretty much everywhere totalitarian governments arise even in the real world.



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30 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 2, Episode 3

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Season 2: Episode 1 - Episode 2

Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
This episode brings us full circle with the return of Ravenwood, the private security firm who wrought havoc over the region during the lawless period after the September Attacks. It turns out that Ravenwood is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Jennings & Rall, which just so happens to be the corporation being contracted by the new government to administer day-to-day operations in place of the military. Just in case you missed it, Jennings & Rall is a very thinly-veiled caricature of Haliburton, and Ravenwood is their own private army. 

With the company largely running things, Ravenwood operators are practically above the law. That being the case, it's likely they would be just as dangerous in a reconstruction period as during the lawless times. There's actually a real-world historical corollary for this when examining the period immediately following the American Civil War. During those years, employees of firms like the Pinkerton Detective Agency ran roughshod over people in the former Confederate States, often terrorizing them into selling their property to the Pinkerton's railroad employers. 

Some other things we can take from this episode involve those operating trading posts traveling to other distant trading posts via armed convoy, if necessary, to trade goods and bring back stock for their own towns. This is also a means by which news is spread from one distant locale to another, just like it occurred in the Old World. In this episode, this is specifically represented by troubling news about outbreaks of the Hudson River Virus (which the government-sanitized media claims not to have spread past the Mississippi River), an apparently deadly and virulent pandemic that arose in the eastern United States during the period after the attacks when people were without modern sanitation.



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29 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 2, Episode 2

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Season 2: Episode 1

Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
The focus of the second season has moved away from survival during a lawless societal collapse scenario to one of a reconstruction period as a new government rises to power. Unfortunately and realistically, in my opinion, this kind of setting would bring with it its own dangers. For instance, the opportunity such a time would afford for people to tinker with the structure of government could lead to us being saddled with a much more repressive system that doesn't place the proper value on personal liberty and individual rights. 

Examples of this from the storyline of the show are many and frightening to think about. Starting with a completely unelected government moving forward with a Constitutional Convention, the plot draws us deeper and deeper into foreshadowing a worrisome future. Among such issues is the fact that the new Allied States of America would not be affording its citizens the right to bear arms. 

Other indications that all is not well under the auspices of the new government include new textbooks full of revisionist history being provided for teaching in schools and the fact that it's obvious the press is being controlled by the government. All news is being approved and sanitized for public consumption and the media is not being allowed to report on or question controversial government policies. Instead, the people are being anesthetized by the lure of electricity and other modern services, while everything is wrapped in pageantry and false patriotism to hide the cancer within.



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28 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 2 Premiere, Episode 1

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
This episode – the Season 2 Premiere –  marks a point in the progression of the show's timeline where the focus shifts from being a story about survival in the midst of a societal collapse to one about a community attempting to find its place in a world where a new government is rising to replace the old one that fell apart in the wake of the September attacks. To be clear, this government has apparently been getting itself back on its feet during some of the time the people have Jericho have been struggling for survival, only the Jericho citizens and viewers of the show have not fully been aware of what was happening outside the area covered by the story. We learned in a mid-season episode of Season 1 that there were multiple parties claiming the Presidency of the United States, and so Season 2 now promises to bring the people of Jericho into direct contact with one of those rival governments, specifically the one based in Cheyenne, Wyoming and fronted by a "President" who was the junior U.S. Senator from Wyoming prior to everything falling apart.

We joined the story just after elements of the 10th Mountain Division have intervened and put an end to the battle between Jericho and New Bern, forcing both parties into an uneasy armistice. The fact is that, even in a completely debilitating disaster or long-term emergency that rocks our current system to its core, it's pretty doubtful that the government is going to disappear entirely. Rather, it's much more likely we would see a situation similar to the one portrayed in the show. This means that surviving elements of the federal government (or multiple elements) will probably remain in operation, even if they do so in a comparatively weakened state. It is also a realistic expectation, in my opinion, that such elements would step in to quell situations like the New Bern War. After all, the legitimacy of any government must be measured by its power to enforce law and keep the peace, so they would need to bring skirmishes between citizens to an end in an effort to maintain control. 

Unfortunately, after a time of people being completely on their own and making their own law, a reconstruction period might understandably be a difficult adjustment for some. It's entirely realistic to expect that, in the interest of  securing peace, concessions would be made up to and including amnesty for crimes committed during the months of lawlessness. As a result, being ordered to end hostilities won't necessarily keep people from trying to settle scores.



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27 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 1, Episode 22

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
And so now, with this episode serving as the Season One Finale, we come to the actual war between the neighboring Kansas towns of Jericho and New Bern. Two things before getting into lessons we can take away from the story: 1) This actually still stands years later as one of the most raw and emotional episodes of television I have ever watched; and 2) This amazing show was actually canceled after the first season, but returned for a shortened Season 2 (which I will begin writing about tomorrow) after an intense and historic response from fans clamoring for more

With respect to things we can learn, it's important to remember that in many instances, it may be necessary for normal civilian leadership of a town or even a group to defer to others in matters of martial conflict when those others happen to possess actual military combat experience. Certain Native American tribes knew the wisdom of this: they would have both a White Chief (an older wiser patriarch) who ruled in times of peace as well as a Red Chief (a younger leader of warriors) who would take over during times of trouble. In such conflicts, it's also important to note that our modern-day perception of adulthood will likely be pushed to the wayside in a sufficiently destructive disaster or long-term emergency that results in a societal collapse. At times like those portrayed in the show, we can expect a return to what was true for the majority of human civilization and see much younger people, conceivably all able-bodied persons 16 years of age and up, being called upon to fight.



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26 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 1, Episode 21

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
In this episode, we continue the build-up to the pending hostilities between Jericho and the neighboring town of New Bern, Kansas. It isn't difficult to look back now and realize that the entire season has been leading toward this climactic conflict, slowly at first when the parties from Jericho and New Bern first met at the Black Jack trading grounds and we learned through dialogue that the latter town's mayor had stepped down and handed all power over to the sheriff as somewhat of a dictator. It's pretty clear the way Russel talks about things that Sheriff Constantino had been keeping order in that town by using extreme measures even back then. But then New Bern faded into the background for a bit, before the writers expertly reintroduced them to the plotline by tying everything together around the situation with the Ravenwood private security operators and setting up a situation where they now perceive Jericho as an enemy.

It's a crazy thought in our modern world to consider the possibility of two towns in the American heartland that were once high school football rivals just a few months previous being on the verge of going to war with one another, but the history of human civilization is rich with such conflicts. Greek city-states warred often with one another and neighboring medieval lords had their share of disputes as well, which were most often resolved by the crown to which they both had sworn homage, but there were times it came to blood before everything was said and done. Create a situation where the federal government of the United States is no longer the law of the land and state governments haven't stepped in to fill the void, and I can easily see where it would be realistic for individual cities and towns to revert to a more tribal city-state form of government. Things are even begun in a more Old World kind of way with a messenger from one town traveling alone to another. The only difference between the events of this episode and history is that the boy sent from New Bern is there to deliver a two-way radio, so that the leadership of both towns can speak to one another directly instead of through diplomatic emissaries. 

Lessons we can take from this installment of the series involve the owner of a farm offering board to displaced refugees in return for them standing guard and defending the land during the conflict, a concept taken directly from modes of medieval land tenure where individuals were interested with the rights to acreage in return for military service. We also see the characters in the show scouting their enemies on foot, horseback, and dirt bikes. Four wheelers and other ATVs would also be useful for such a task. And lastly, there's the age-old concept of overcoming one-sided odds by offering a percentage of all the spoils from the fighting to a potential ally in return for them helping your side in a fight. This is a concept that is also rich throughout human history, and it's basically the way the Scandinavian peoples often called Vikings operated; ship-owners attracted crews of warriors by offering to share war spoils, and the same thing was done all the way up the ladder with the leaders attracting multiple ship-owners to form a fleet and go Viking (raiding).


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25 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 1, Episode 20

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
Continuing the ongoing storyline of the building conflict with the nearby town of New Bern, Kansas, a point which this episode brings very clearly to light is that - in harsher times - a community with resources could become a target for other communities without. Something as simple as arable farmland could mean the difference between life and death when there are other places where the land is all clay and rock. Whether we're talking about whole towns or just a family retreat, when people are starving real war is possible even in the middle of the modern-day American heartland. 

Tensions over resources or even other things could create situations akin to a powder keg ready to blow with the slightest provocation. And, heaven forbid any actual violence should erupt in such tense situations, because it would likely only feed into things and result in an even more intense level of animosity. 

In closing, this episode of the series also drives home a very good point regarding liquor stills. I have previously discussed having a moonshine still as a means of being able to create something to use for barter in the event of a SHTF societal collapse (a plan with which I still agree). In addition to its obvious and normal use, though, a moonshine still would also give survivors the capability of creating antiseptic, which could mean the difference between life and death in many medical situations.



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24 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 1, Episode 19

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
One thing this series goes above and beyond in accomplishing is introducing the viewer to many varied and subtle aspects of a world where the conventions of our modern society no longer rule the lives of the people. We have talked previously about the show spotlighting the way the local grocery market was converted into an Old West-style trading post, but this episode also delves into the subject matter of business in a world where there is no structured legal system to call upon to settle disputes that might arise. Specifically, this episode explores the possibility of existing business arrangements no longer being honored in the form of a young girl's part ownership of the local salt mine not being honored as a result of there not being any proof that her parents are deceased (they were vacationing when the attacks occurred). Subjects like this are something that we rarely think about when discussing the possibility of a societal collapse, yet it is very interesting to think about. 

From that subject matter, this episode also explores how an isolating disaster or long-term emergency can effectively shrink the world from the perspective of the people. We are so accustomed to living in a large nation unified by a central government that we perhaps don't often think about how things would be in the absence of that unifying government. Well, this episode of the series depicts that fairly realistically, in my opinion, showing the way that neighboring communities would likely revert to a more tribal or city-state-based way of doing things, creating a situation where actual warfare could be a possibility. 

The nearby town of New Bern, Kansas it seems did not fare nearly as well as Jericho when the Ravenwood private security contractors rolled through the area. We will eventually learn that they came to New Bern after leaving Jericho, resulting in the town being stripped of a good amount of their supplies and several deputies being killed. Following this, the mayor of the town resigned and handed all power to the sheriff as something of a dictator, who quickly fortified the town and began running things as more akin to a military operation (we learned some of this from dialogue in Episode 13). The stark differences between the two towns are impossible not to immediately notice, things in Jericho being mostly peaceful while the New Bern town hall stands scorched, peppered with bullet holes, and featuring sandbag-enclosed defensive gun positions and rooftop lookouts/snipers. 

The situation in New Bern was particularly bleak as a result of both the initial disaster as well as their run-in with Ravenwood, the soil in the area being comprised mostly of clay with few farms to feed the people. Whereas Jericho was rich in natural resources (farmland and the local salt mine), New Bern was a factory town, which is why they began constructing the wind turbines discussed in previous episodes. Unfortunately, you can't eat wind turbines, and a large amount of resentment has apparently grown among of the populace of that town against the people of Jericho, whom they perceive as having full bellies while they starve and being responsible for not warning them of the approach of the rogue Ravenwood operators. 

And the final lesson we can take from this episode revolves around the use of torture during interrogations. Essentially what it boils down to is that torture is unreliable when it comes to extracting information, but the threat of torture is a different story. It is the fear of torture that gets results, whereas real torture only works in the movies.



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23 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 1, Episode 18

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
While this particular episode of the show might be a bit short on lessons that are possible for us to learn, it did provide quite a lot of background on the unbelievably destructive terrorist plot that set in motion the events of the series. Without going into a lot of background of the story that would qualify as Spoilers for anyone having not already seen it, we can say that the terrorist plot itself – while a bit of a stretch – is not entirely unrealistic. Speaking strictly in broad strokes, the nuclear weapons used in the attacks were apparently modified from old Soviet bombs placed on the black market after the fall of the Soviet Union. The plot itself seems to have involved many disparate groups banding together in their shared goal of toppling the US federal government. Like I said, a bit of a stretch  but not entirely outside the realm of being a future threat in a real world scenario. 

There are a few things we can glean from the episode though, not the least of which being the practice of placing a paperclip in your door from the outside, making sure you will know if someone has been in there in your absence. In addition to that, we are reminded that even if a community manages to remain sufficiently organized as to continue offering classes at the local schoolhouse, the issue of survival is bound to take precedence over any such pursuits. With that in mind, homeschooling would be a great option and now would be the time when folks should be gaining experience in that endeavor.

Lastly, this episode reminds us that children may have to grow up too fast when they are being raised in an environment dominated by an isolating disaster or long-term emergency, especially in the event of an extended societal collapse. Such an environment will naturally be far more fraught with danger than the world to which we are all accustomed now, and it will prove virtually impossible to protect the child from being exposed to that somehow. Hopefully, such exposure can remain of a passive variety, rather than active where the child actually has to perform acts we think of as being only for adults. Unfortunately, a great deal of that is only wishful thinking, and it's important to remember that people were considered to be adults at a much younger age throughout the majority of human civilization. Still, it is a noble pursuit to try to shield them from the harshness of the world for as long as possible, but we must understand that such protection can only be temporary.



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22 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 1, Episode 17

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
In this episode, the harsh realities of a looming winter without electricity or deliveries of heating fuel began to become especially evident in the storyline of the show. Things have been leading up to the story going in this direction for quite a while, but this is the episode where the proverbial SHTF for the town of Jericho when it comes to the realization that their food and fuel supplies are not likely to last the winter without some very serious cutting back. Sadly, the harsh reality of a situation like that would need to fall right in line with what is portrayed in the show, the refugees previously taken in by the town being the first to be sent away when the burden becomes too much. This is logical. The town rendered aid, but realistically no one is going to watch their own family and friends/neighbors starve in order to feed strangers. Unfortunately, just because the concept of "last in, first out" makes logical sense doesn't mean those being ousted are likely to go peacefully out into a wild and dangerous world. Rather, instances of violence and hostage-taking would not be completely outside the realm of possibility even in a real-world scenario. 

Not for nothing, but it's not entirely unreasonable to expect the level of crime within a community to increase with the addition of a significant population of refugees who have been accustomed to foraging supplies from houses, etc. I don't particularly consider foraging to be the same as looting, but rather a reality of survival. It's a fact, however, that the transition from doing whatever it takes to survive and taking care of oneself to living within a community and trusting others isn't likely to be without complications. Take that for what it's worth with the understanding that YMMV. My advice would be to keep close tabs on any refugees you attempt to help, if you choose to render aid. 

This episode also showed us how the community grocery market seems to have successfully been converted into a productive old-style trading post like we might have seen in the American West 100 years ago. To be honest, even if viewers of the show who are also members of the Prepper / Survivalist community don't take anything else from this series, the example of how they are running the market alone is a priceless lesson on how a barter economy can not only work but provide a nice living. 

For instance, the owner deals with local farmers, entering into agreements where he provides them with seed for planting in return for a percentage of their crop at harvest and a certain number of gallons of gasoline. The food produced and the gasoline then become inventory for the market shelves, traded for other things of value and so on. A later episode will also provide another example where meat from a healthy horse that happened to break its leg is being traded at a rate of 4 pounds of grain for 1 pound of meat. We are never provided any background as to what the owner of the market traded for the meat, but it's still easy to see how his business continues to be conducted even as society itself has fallen apart.



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21 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 1, Episode 16

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
This episode revolves largely around the issue of medical care during a disaster or extended emergency. Just like all of the rest of our complicated and interdependent systems, modern medicine depends on a lot of things which may not be altogether that easy to acquire during bad times, much less an all-out societal collapse like the one portrayed in the show. One thing you can just about be certain of, however, is that anybody with any medical training whatsoever, whether they be paramedics or those still in medical school, would be likely to find themselves pressed into service. 

Depending on the length of the emergency, all important trades – not just that of medical care – may have to revert to the Old World model of Masters teaching Apprentices. Such was the acceptable way of things for the majority of human civilization, so at least we can be reasonably assured that it is a system which works, even if it isn't as efficient as what we have in modern times. My advice has always been that, if you are attempting to gather together a group of people as a survival group, be sure to include those with medical training. Personally, my group has a registered nurse with two decades of experience in operating rooms and emergency room triage situations, a trained CNA, and another one just starting school to become a nurse. Likewise, I have a licensed physician's assistant and several friends who are trained paramedics who I have yet to approach. These individuals can use their skills if need be during an emergency as well as pass those skills on to others. 

One point that this episode does a very good job of getting across is that communities which harbor their own clinics boast a big advantage during an isolating disaster or long-term emergency situation. You can think of these as essentially mini-hospitals. On top of already having an operational hierarchy in place with staff who would probably be on the clock as an emergency began to unfold, these clinics can often include a variety of medical equipment that could extend the likelihood of survival for the surrounding community, ranging from inventories of drugs and antibiotics, IV equipment, ultrasound machines, etc. Obviously, such facilities are not truly ideal for surgery, but operations have been performed under worse conditions as doctors routinely perform surgery as missionaries in Third World village tents. I can't imagine a clinic in rural America would be any worse, despite not being the ideal setup; especially in situations where choosing not to perform the surgery is a death sentence anyway. 

Another good point this episode drives home is the importance of having skills that would be valuable (and marketable) in a societal collapse scenario. The ability to construct wind turbines or other methods of generating alternative power would put one in a unique position to be able to market their skill to gain things they need for survival. And, we see clearly that issues of business and commerce would be likely to take an entirely different form than what we recognize in pre-collapse modern times. 

Namely, I'm referring to the utilization of hostages as a means of enforcing an agreement when there is no legal system upon which to fall back to settle any potential grievances that might arise. That's precisely how things were done in medieval times. Basically, you take one or more hostages whom you treat well (just wanted to clarify, because our modern thinking has taught us to assume poor treatment of hostages) and who are to be released once all parties have fulfilled their part of the agreement, the underlying threat being that chicanery on the part of either party could endanger the safety of the hostages. Operating in such a way definitely sounds barbaric to our modern standards, but it is an effective method that was practiced for the majority of human civilization when systems of law either didn't exist or were unreliable.



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20 July, 2015

REVIEW: "Jericho" - Season 1, Episode 15

A number of plot points will inevitably be revealed in the course of these writings.  My intent is to review this program from the perspective of the Doomer / Prepper / Survivalist community, but, to do that effectively, some things have to be explained in greater detail than I might normally prefer in a review.  As a result, spoilers will follow.  You have been warned.  In truth, you might more accurately describe these posts as in-depth discussions of certain aspects of each episode with an emphasis on how the character's actions might be applicable in a real-life societal collapse.  I hope you enjoy.
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Could you and your family survive a nuclear attack?
Again with this episode, we continue covering the theme of how much more difficult survival through winter is likely to be without modern conveniences like electricity. We discussed previously also that many would choose to migrate south to warmer climates, likely at least beginning their journey in packed automobiles. Another scarcity in such a winter, however, will likely be fuel, so it's anyone's guess how far such refugees would make it before having to abandon the vehicle and move out on foot. I suppose it would depend on the luck of the individual.

My advice in such a situation would be to make a hard assessment about the viability of surviving in whatever location you find yourself before winter sets in, in order to be able to begin any possible journey south before it gets to the point of it representing a choice between basically suicide if you stay or suicide if you leave. I would also argue that such an assessment of viability is especially necessary in the event you find yourself somewhere where you are considered an outsider. This is because invariably when the hard decisions need to be made, the last people into communities will be the first ones either asked to leave or made to do so when resources begin to become more scarce.

And lastly, this episode reminds us of the age-old truth: if something seems too good to be true, it probably is too good to be true. I won't go into anymore detail on that here, because I don't want to be one of those sites which posts outright Spoilers that take away from a reader's enjoyment of actually reviewing the material for themselves. I simply wish to make the point that if something like that is true now, it will be much more so when people find themselves in a survival situation. Con artists and confidence people make a living even in today's world by taking advantage of and defrauding others in pursuit of money, so you had better believe the same will be true in a survival situation when people are looking for food and warmth to keep them alive.


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